Moving from physical data storage to cloud-based software could save tears down the road.
Moving from physical data storage to cloud-based software could save tears down the road. Scyther

OPINION: Switch back-up files to the cloud to be safe

THE old narrative was simple. Open your word processor, type what you have to say, save it to your computer.

Print it, email it, delete it - everything was done from a spinning platter via a magnetic needle inside the box under your desk. We then began to back things up, which initially meant saving it to a second spinning platter somewhere else under your desk.

Now, as the week of research I just lost can attest, we know to be even more careful than that.

It's fun to talk about the cloud storing our business's data and our emails being stored in the cloud and what have you, but deep habits are keeping a lot of us from saying goodbye to software and storage kept in our houses and saying hello to putting all of our creative, business, and academic processes entirely online.

How would you do this? Most of us can do without Microsoft office. Google Docs has everything most of us need to write, budget, and present for free and entirely backed up in the cloud, available everywhere from any device.

Why would one do this? Well, the week of research I just lost is a good reason. I have six terabytes of storage attached to my network at home and every six hours all of my work is backed up in two different places. Now, while I was feeling great for being so responsible, the HDD I keep all my work on died in a final kind of way.

"That's okay! I'm a clever boy and I have everything backed up as of about two hours ago!"

Except I didn't. About a week ago someone accidentally knocked a key network cable out of my router and none of the backups went through. I lost everything I'd done since then. So why not try moving from the physical gear in front of you to a cloud-based bunch of software? It might save you plenty of tears down the road.


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