Scientists build a portable invisibility cloak

RESEARCHERS have built a small box that could be used to completely hide small objects, like a real-life invisibility cloak.

Scientists have built systems that hide objects by bending light around them, so that they can't be seen - but they have previously only been tiny and worked at small wavelength ranges. But scientists from the German Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) claimed to have built an invisibility cloak big enough to hide small objects, like phones, keys or a wheel of cheese.

To use the cloak, objects are put inside the small, long box that is coated with a special paint. The box bends light around it, causing the objects placed in it to disappear from sight.

And the way it is built allows it to be easily transported, meaning it can be taken to classrooms to inspire students.

The team behind the new invisibility cloak are set to demonstrate it at a conference in California next week.

Topics:  games and gadgets

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