Rowan Baxter seemed like a nice guy at the start but soon his possessive and abusive tendencies surfaced. He controlled every part of Hannah Clarke's life.
Rowan Baxter seemed like a nice guy at the start but soon his possessive and abusive tendencies surfaced. He controlled every part of Hannah Clarke's life.

Red flags that led to murder: Monster’s dark spiral

He seemed like a nice guy at first but soon wife killer Rowan Baxter would show his true colours - setting his three young children and estranged wife on fire after ambushing them at Camp Hill this year in one of Australia's worst domestic violence murders.

On February 19, Baxter ambushed Hannah Clarke and their children on their way to school, dousing all four with petrol and setting them alight, the three children dying instantly, Hannah later that evening in hospital.

Hannah Clarke’s family has told of her desperate bid to escape the abusive relationship from the man who would eventually kill her.
Hannah Clarke’s family has told of her desperate bid to escape the abusive relationship from the man who would eventually kill her.

Baxter would also die from a self-inflicted knife wound at the crime scene.

Now Hannah's family bravely reveal how she courageously escaped a monster only for him to come after her.

In this tell-all interview, they reveal his downward spiral from controlling husband to heinous killer.

MOMENT A MONSTER ERUPTED: KILLER DAD'S GUTLESS RAMPAGE

###

Hannah lived a charmed childhood with her parents Lloyd and Sue Clarke and brother Nat.

Then one Friday night in 2008, a 20-year-old Hannah brought her new boyfriend home for dinner.

At first, there were no red flags. At least, not big enough to signal danger.

Sure, Lloyd says, at 31, his daughter's new boyfriend Rowan Baxter was 11 years older than his daughter, and had a way of walking into the pea green house like he owned the joint.

But Baxter was a former player with the New Zealand Warriors squad and, as an ex- footballer himself, Lloyd knew a bit about the swagger that could come with it.

Hannah’s parents, Lloyd and Sue, in the pea green house. Picture: Mark Cranitch
Hannah’s parents, Lloyd and Sue, in the pea green house. Picture: Mark Cranitch

Baxter, then a personal trainer, had met Hannah when he took a boxing class at the Carindale PCYC gym where she coached trampoline.

Baxter was living with his ex-partner and son (the Clarke family have asked their names not be printed) and only staying, he told his young girlfriend, for his boy's sake.

Later, it would become known that Baxter had threatened this family also, and that his own family background in New Zealand was murky and violent.

But in the early years of the relationship, Hannah was happy with her handsome, older boyfriend who showered her with attention.

Hannah Clarke and Rowan Baxter.
Hannah Clarke and Rowan Baxter.

There were, Sue says, "blips", like Hannah not being allowed her own Facebook account, instead having to share one with Baxter, who posted endless photos of his beautiful girlfriend in her bikinis but didn't allow her to walk from the beach to her car wearing them. Banned too, was her signature crop top and shorts at the gym. "He's just a bit of a prude, Mum," Hannah would say.

After four years, the couple married in a ceremony so expensive that Lloyd and Sue had to extend their mortgage to pay for it.

Hannah, they say, would have been happy to marry anywhere, but Baxter was adamant; like his social media photos, his wedding had to be picture perfect.

On October 19, 2012, the couple married at a Kingscliff resort, a three-day affair on which the Clarkes spent $30,000 (Baxter's family did not contribute) and where Baxter became incensed at how little money the guests had put in the wishing well.

"I tried to calm him down, explaining that people had to pay for their accommodation as well, but he was furious, singling out people as "f--king scabs", because he thought he deserved more," Lloyd says.

Baxter would always think he deserved more and the Clarke family would spend the next decade trying, just as Lloyd did at the reception, to calm him down about it.

For her part, Hannah was 14 weeks pregnant on the day of her wedding.

Hannah Clarke and Rowan Baxter on their wedding day.
Hannah Clarke and Rowan Baxter on their wedding day.

When Aaliyah was born on October 4, 2013, Hannah was overjoyed.

She had wanted to be a mother for a long time, her husband had a decent job as a pharmaceutical rep, and she was working full-time at the Athletes Foot sports store in Capalaba.

"He (the Clarkes rarely refer to Baxter by name) let us see Hannah and Aaliyah all the time back then," Lloyd recalls, "because we'd figured out that as long as we let him run the show, things were easier … so we let him run the show."

Hannah loved her children dearly.
Hannah loved her children dearly.

But by the time the couple's second daughter, Laianah, was born on March 19, 2015, things were not quite as rosy.

Baxter had quit his rep job, not liking the travel it involved, which took him away from his family.

Hannah, however, confided in her mother that she didn't mind it at all; that things were "calmer" at home without him.

Her husband's road trips also gave her a break from the nightly sex Baxter demanded, no matter how tired she was from work, or looking after the kids, or both.

Hannah fought to leave her marriage.
Hannah fought to leave her marriage.

If she didn't comply, or if she wasn't enthusiastic enough, Baxter would sulk, or accuse her of not loving him enough. It was easier, she said, to "just give in".

In February 2015, Baxter opened his own "cross fit" gym in Mansfield, on Brisbane's southside, his parents-in-law again putting up a large amount of money.

"We heavily invested in it because, to be fair, he did know his stuff, but mostly to help Hannah out," Lloyd Clarke says.

Hannah Clarke at the gym.
Hannah Clarke at the gym.

But the gym, although it started off well, was soon struggling, in part because of Baxter's attitude; he was frequently rude to members and publicly shamed people for not training hard enough.

Members began leaving despite Hannah's popularity; her classes were always full, Baxter's, increasingly sparse.

One day, Sue (Lloyd and Sue were both members and went regularly) had enough.

Hannah’s family tried to protect her from the monster. Photo: Mark Cranitch.
Hannah’s family tried to protect her from the monster. Photo: Mark Cranitch.

"We had a fight over something he had done, and he said, 'Well, no-one asked you to be here',and I lost my cool.

"I said, 'If it wasn't for me, you wouldn't be here'. That was it, Sue says, the moment the curtain came down.

Although Hannah would later ring and beg her mother to apologise ("which I did, even though it killed me") from that moment on, Baxter began separating his wife from her family, alienating them just as he had alienated the gym members who fled from his door.

Rowan Baxter at the gym.
Rowan Baxter at the gym.

There would be two more gyms (another at Mansfield where Baxter moved after a dispute with his neighbours, and then a third at Capalaba, which opened in 2019) all of which Lloyd and Sue would cough up money for, in the hope of helping their daughter.

But it didn't help, and by the time Trey was born on December 4, 2016, Hannah was exhausted, teary and growing daily more isolated from those who loved her.

Hannah Clarke and her beautiful children.
Hannah Clarke and her beautiful children.

"It really upsets me that Hannah and I grew apart for a while," Nat says. "I hate that I let Rowan get between us."

But get between Nat and Hannah, Baxter did, edging Nat, and later his wife Stacey, 33, and their two children Jayden, 3, and Tyler 2, out of the frame.

When the couple, who had met as fly-in, fly out workers at a mine in Western Australia, bought a house on the Gold Coast, Baxter couldn't contain his jealousy, Nat says.

"He'd say, 'This was our dream (Hannah and her husband rented throughout their marriage), you're never even home in it, you're just showing off.'

"And then, he just kind of pulled her away from us. He'd put things in Hann's head about things we, or Mum and Dad had supposedly said, and it felt hopeless, like she believed everything he told her."

But his sister was not as enthralled by her husband as Nat thought, because behind the scenes, Hannah, the Warrior, was gathering her strength.

 

Hannah Clarke with her children at the beach.
Hannah Clarke with her children at the beach.

She had started confiding in her parents, her sister-in-law, her best friend Nikki Brooks, and other women from the gym.

About how her husband demanded sex every night.

How he went through her bag daily. How she was almost positive he was recording her conversations.

How he called her fat, laughing at her "mummy tummy".

How he wouldn't let her send the kids to her mum's for a break.

Rowan Baxter controlled his wife’s life.
Rowan Baxter controlled his wife’s life.

How he stopped going to work, saying he was unwell, so he could better keep a closer eye on her.

How she once caught him staring at her from outside their bedroom window; "I've been out there for ages," Baxter said, "trying to scare you".

How he put her family down constantly.

How she was a "shit" mother. How lucky she was to have him. How she simply yearned for peace.

Nikki Brooks, friend of murder victim Hannah Clarke. Picture: Mark Cranitch
Nikki Brooks, friend of murder victim Hannah Clarke. Picture: Mark Cranitch

But try as she might, Hannah couldn't give Aaliyah, Laianah and Trey the sort of home she had grown up in.

And so - after a couple of false starts, which saw her leave, then return to her husband - in early December, 2019, Hannah and her children returned to the pea green house in Camp Hill.

"We had it all ready for them," Sue remembers.

"We had to do it bit by bit, you know, we'd put in bunk beds for the kids just in case, and I'd been storing a few things here and there; clothes, school uniforms, passports."

We knew that he (Baxter) would be angry, but we had decided enough was enough, and that we would get legal and police help if need be."

But the Clarkes also wanted to be fair, to give Baxter access to his children at least three days a week, more if he wanted. Hannah regularly took the kids to meet him; Lloyd, Sue, Nat and Stacey remained civil, everyone still trying to calm Baxter down.

Aaliyah, Laianah and Trey.
Aaliyah, Laianah and Trey.

On December 5, Hannah, concerned about an increasingly demanding Baxter, went, at her parents' urging, to her local police station.

Told by police to take out a Domestic Violence Order against her husband (when Clarke recounted the nightly sex she was forced to provide for Baxter, a female police officer told her, "Oh darling, that's rape, I can give you a DVO just for that"), she declined.

"She said that she was scared of making things worse," Sue says.

On December 21, after a visit with his children, Baxter didn't return them at the agreed time. "It was awful," Lloyd says, "he just didn't show and he kept Hannah in the dark for a couple of hours before he rang and said: "I think I'm going to take them away for a few days."

Hannah with Trey.
Hannah with Trey.

"Hannah was absolutely distraught. We were all crying and fighting with each other about what to do, and we could hear Aaliyah crying in the car, and saying 'I don't know where we are, mummy'."

Hannah negotiated with Baxter to meet him at a nearby service station, returning in tears to her parent's home with her children later that night.

Despite this, the Clarke family - still trying to keep the peace - invited Baxter to share Christmas Day with them.

"We didn't want to," Lloyd said, "but for some reason, I still had some compassion for him.

"I went to see him and said, 'Mate, come for Christmas Day, but this behaviour has got to stop', that he needed to be a bigger person, a better person, that we could all work something out."

Lloyd and Sue Clarke, parents of Hannah Clarke. Picture: Mark Cranitch
Lloyd and Sue Clarke, parents of Hannah Clarke. Picture: Mark Cranitch

Baxter arrived at 5am and stayed all day, opening presents, eating lunch and enjoying the Clarkes' hospitality.

Then, on Boxing Day, he took Laianah.

"He asked if Hannah could bring the kids to a skate park in Bulimba. She didn't want to but she did," Sue recalls.

"When they were walking back to Hannah's car, he had Laianah in his arms, and he just stopped in the middle of a road, turned around, ran to his car and threw her in the front seat. Laianah was crying, and Hannah was screaming to give her back, and then he drove off."

But not before slowing down beside a hysterical Hannah, putting his window down a few centimetres to tell her: "You've done this."

Baxter would drive to a friend's house in Pottsville, in northern NSW, and stay for three days. Hannah went to the police, who located Laianah, returned her to her mother, and issued Baxter with both a DVO and a child protection order.

Baxter’s behaviour became even more worrying following the split.
Baxter’s behaviour became even more worrying following the split.

On January 6, 2020, a court overturned the order, allowing Baxter access to his children and, over the next few weeks, Baxter would repeatedly breach the DVO, turning up at Hannah's work, when she was out shopping, standing outside cafes where she was having a coffee, everywhere she turned, she told a friend, 
"he was there".

But she was determined to make a new life for herself and her children, and was due to return to court in April to apply for further conditions on the DVO.

"Make no mistake, Hannah was a warrior," Stacey says, "and she fought for her babies until the very end."

 

Nat Clarke, brother of murder victim Hannah Clarke with wife Stacey and children Jayden 3, and Tyler, 2 . Picture: Mark Cranitch
Nat Clarke, brother of murder victim Hannah Clarke with wife Stacey and children Jayden 3, and Tyler, 2 . Picture: Mark Cranitch

He lay in wait, with the can of petrol in his hand. Hiding at the side of the pea green house before ambushing Hannah and the three children just after 8am on the morning of February 19, 2020.

He doused them in petrol, and told Hannah to drive.

She did, just around the corner from her parents' house to Raven Street, where she spotted a man outside of his house, stopped the car, and started screaming for help.

"He's doused me and the kids in petrol, call the police."

The man would later tell police that Baxter had Hannah in a bear hug, trying to stop her from getting out.

The scene at Camp Hill. (AAP image, John Gass)
The scene at Camp Hill. (AAP image, John Gass)

But, as she later recounted in a police video, Hannah thought that if she could just get Baxter to chase her, he might only kill her, and leave the children alone.

So she tried to get out, and managed to open the door; Hannah, the Warrior, fighting for her babies to the very end.

There was a flash, an explosion of light and fire, as Baxter extinguished Aaliyah, Laianah, and Trey's dancing lights.

Hannah would later die in the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, but not before giving testimony, walking herself to the ambulance stretcher, looking directly into the camera and telling the police exactly what Baxter had done.

"She didn't know that he had killed himself then," Lloyd says (Baxter, after stopping several people from going to Hannah's aid or approaching the car, had stabbed himself to death) and she was making sure that he would pay for what he had done."

'BURNT, DYING: HANNAH'S EXTRAORDINARY LAST POLICE INTERVIEW

Police commissioner Katarina Carroll arrives at the home of the parents of Hannah Clarke.
Police commissioner Katarina Carroll arrives at the home of the parents of Hannah Clarke.

Queensland Police Commissioner Katarina Carroll would later tell the family that Hannah's testimony, given with burns to 97 per cent of her body, was "astonishing".

For more information and to donate to Small Steps for Hannah, visit smallsteps4hannah.com.au. All donations are tax deductible.

 

For help, please call:

1800 RESPECT (1800 737 732), the National Sexual Assault, Domestic Family Violence Counselling Service.

DV Connect, 24 hour domestic violence helpline: 1800 811 811

Lifeline: 13 11 14 for 24-hour crisis support

 

 

 

Originally published as Red flags that led to murder: Monster's dark spiral


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