Australian Sally Pearson on her way to winning the women's 100m hurdles at the world championships in London.
Australian Sally Pearson on her way to winning the women's 100m hurdles at the world championships in London. Takehiko Suzuki

Pearson sticking with world title-winning formula

SALLY Pearson has confirmed she will continue to go it alone as her own coach heading into the Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast next year.

In the wake of her world championships victory in the 100m hurdles, Pearson said she would stick to what is working for her.

Pearson proved she has a future in coaching after her sprinting career by training herself during one of the great sporting comebacks.

"For me, coaching myself has been a wonderful journey and I want to continue that in the future," the 30-year-old said.

Pearson decided a year ago to coach herself as she returned to the track from a potentially career-threatening hamstring injury that cost her a spot at a third Olympic Games in Rio.

The success of her own program was evident when she completed an emotional comeback to claim gold in the 100m hurdles at the IAAF world championships in London last month.

"That was the plan when I started out coaching myself last year. I kept an open mind and said if it doesn't work out then I can always find someone that can help," she said.

"But it's worked well. At the same time I have a very open mind and if it does happen, I will be comfortable with it, but at the moment it's purely me."

 

Sally Pearson hands out bananas to junior athletes during the announcement of a new deal between Athletics Australia, Little Athletics and supermarket chain Coles.
Sally Pearson hands out bananas to junior athletes during the announcement of a new deal between Athletics Australia, Little Athletics and supermarket chain Coles. ADRIAN WARREN

Pearson was in Sydney on Thursday at the announcement of a multi-million-dollar, three-year deal between Athletics Australia, Little Athletics and Coles to boost involvement in the sport at all levels. The deal includes more than two million bananas to be donated to local clubs at Little Athletics meets.

She said athletics was in a good place in Australia and was predicting "stars to be born" at the Commonwealth Games and the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo.

"I think we are in a really good spot. The team that went to the world championships this year was very exciting," she said, praising the likes of young sprinters Ella Nelson, Riley Day and Ella Connolly.

"We are a very young team at the moment and that sits well going into the Commonwealth Games.

"I think we are going to see a lot of new stars born at the Commonwealth Games and beyond going into Tokyo."

News Corp Australia

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