BIOMETRICS TAKEOVER: Facial recognition software will eliminate the needs for passwords, Harvey Norman proprietor Matthew Holden welcomes the new technology
BIOMETRICS TAKEOVER: Facial recognition software will eliminate the needs for passwords, Harvey Norman proprietor Matthew Holden welcomes the new technology Nicole Zurcas

Passwords a thing of the past

A BRAVE new world of facial recognition software are entering our daily lives.

Technology companies grouped together for the 2018 CEBIT conference with biometric industries leading the discussion on entering the global age of facial verification.

Primarily used on large scale security operations the technology is entering our every day lives and experts think the software will take over the use of passwords.

Passwords have so far been a necessary form of security which can leave some of us stranded if we fail to remember four digit codes or our first pet's name.

The biometric technology has offered a simple alternative Harvey Norman proprietor Matthew Holden said .

"The technology in our phones makes it more accessible, it's quick to use and leaves your phone secure from others if you lose it," he said.

Facial recognition software is based on algorithms that scan faces to pick up individual identifiers, such as the space between a person's eyes, nose and other features, to create a unique biometric map.

The technology we see in our phone and tablet devices use iris and fingerprint scanning to create unique keys to unlocking the device.

"The iris is similar to a fingerprint, in which everyone has a unique print," Mr Holden said.

"Phones will use over 500 different points of the face and they will need at least a plus 95 per cent accuracy to work."

The Australian government is currently undergoing plans for a nationwide facial-matching system.

In the lead up to the Gold Coast Commonwealth games, Queensland rushed through laws to ensure the technology was scanning to optimise security.

Like all innovations a growing population of doubt is concerned with the technologies accuracy and invasion of privacy.

"There are different levels of software based on what they're made to secure," Mr Holden said

"Banks and other companies have done expensive research into the safety of this technology and to ensure it works."

Mr Holden said the technology will be the "ultimate way" to log into all devices and the use of passwords will only be for back up measures.


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