Boral Asphalt Plant in Alstonville
Boral Asphalt Plant in Alstonville

Alstonville subdivision near Boral Asphalt Plant approved

UPDATE Thursday 11.30am: A MOTION to stop a residential subdivision in Alstonville, near the Boral Asphalt Plant, was lost at today's Ballina Shire Council.

The motion was raised as the decision to approve the creation of four large residential lots in Alstonville did not sit well with a number of councillors.

The land is zoned low-density residential and positioned just 300m from the Boral Asphalt Plant.

Councillors Jeff Johnson, Sharon Parry and Keith Williams lodged a rescission motion to stop the residential development.

The motion aimed to refuse the proposal on the grounds that it will have "unreasonable impacts on the amenity of the future residents of the subdivision in terms of noise, dust and odour from the Tuckombil Quarry and the Boral Asphalt Plant," according to council documents.

More to come.

ORIGINAL STORY: THE decision to approve the creation of four large residential lots in Alstonville near an industrial estate did not sit well with a number of Ballina Shire Councillors.

The land is zoned low-density residential and positioned just 300m from the Boral Asphalt Plant as the crow flies.

Councillors have lodged a rescission motion to stop the residential development, and will decide on the matter at the upcoming meeting on Thursday, a month after it was initially approved.

The motion, lodged by Councillors Jeff Johnson, Sharon Parry and Keith Williams, aims to refuse the proposal on the grounds that it will have "unreasonable impacts on the amenity of the future residents of the subdivision in terms of noise, dust and odour from the Tuckombil Quarry and the Boral Asphalt Plant," according to council documents.

The matter elicited great debate at the May meeting.

"Unsuspecting residents will buy properties and then the complaints will come flooding in," Cr Sharon Cadwallader said.

"It could put into jeopardy the operations of the plant."

Councillors discussed a nearby housing development that was approved last year.

"We approved a residential development two lots down, to then turn around and say, 'No you can't do that', isn't fair," Cr Phil Meehan said.

"We're not being consistent."

Cr Sharon Parry argued that two wrongs would not make a right.

"Sometimes council does get it wrong," she said.

"I wish we hadn't approved a development so close to the plant, but it's not a good reason to do it again.

"The EPA recommends a buffer of 1000m if the plant uses old technology, and Boral does."


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