It's in the stars

Astrologer Patsy Bennett.
Astrologer Patsy Bennett. Greg Saunders

GOING straight to the heart of what a person needs is the most satisfying part of Patsy Bennett's astrology practice.

"What can often happen in a reading, this one particular astrological aspect called the moon's north node, can really embody what Oprah (Winfrey) calls the 'aha moment', where we'll be looking at someone's astrological chart and the person says 'I really understand what that has all been about now'. And the moon's north node is always the standout part of the reading because when we understand the bigger picture it can be quite a revelation,” she said.

Bennett said she felt rewarded because her astrological practice helped people and gave them comfort. She said she wanted to become an astrologer for as long as she could remember.

Bennett's background in journalism in women's magazines in the United Kingdom and in newspapers in northern New South Wales led her to writing astrology columns. She still provides columns for the ARM group of newspapers, which also publishes the Weekend magazine. Bennett has also provided astrology consultations for more than 20 years.

"I think my first real memory of picking up an astrology book was at about 12 and it was all really fascinating,” she said.

"I think (the attraction to astrology) at that age was having a deeper understanding of people. The first book I picked up was a sun sign book. At 12, you have an idea that not everyone is the same and it gave me a bit of insight into people's differences. I guess you might call it even a bit of a psychological insight.”

The astrologer said in Australia there were a number of groups people could join to learn more about astrology. She said people could also complete diploma courses and, in a couple of other countries, astrology had started to come back into universities.

Bennett said the divide between astrology and astronomy occurred when scientists discovered the sun, and not the Earth, was the centre of the solar system. Astronomy became the study of the physical aspect of planets and stars, and astrology became the study of the interpretation of the effects of celestial bodies on Earth.

"Astrology and astronomy were one and the same thing until about the 17th century,” Bennett said.

"It's all starting to come back again as a serious study.”

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