Tara McWilliams is the mastermind behind Married At First Sight.
Tara McWilliams is the mastermind behind Married At First Sight.

Inside home of TV’s most feared woman

It's the million dollar home that Married At First Sight built.

Tara McWilliams, the executive producer behind Channel 9's controversial reality series, has offloaded her pad in Sydney's exclusive eastern suburbs for $2,375,000 million, just one year after purchasing the property.

McWilliams - who is considered one of the most powerful people in Australian television - bought the two-level Rose Bay home in April 2019 for $1.91 million. The sale falls short of the TV honcho's initial hopes of $2.5m but still managed to score a $400,000 profit after 77 days on the market.

Despite the OTT drama of the TV empire she has built, it seems McWilliams prefers a more laid-back style in her private life - with photos of her former home showing a light, bright and unpretentious space.

Tara McWilliams has been at the helm of MAFS since 2016.
Tara McWilliams has been at the helm of MAFS since 2016.


The 1930s semi-detached home has been completely transformed over the years, with a second level added and modern white finishes throughout. It boasts three bedrooms and two bathrooms, with the master bedroom offering a private balcony that overlooks parklands behind the property.

Natural light floods the kitchen and living areas that lead out to a paved courtyard with manicured hedges. Timber floors and neutral tones add to the contemporary style.

As the mastermind behind one of the country's most talked about shows, McWilliams is estimated to be paid a minimum of $250,000 a year for her work calling the shots on the series.

She might be one of the most powerful people in television, but she's also one of the most controversial. The mum-of-one took on the role as executive producer of Married At First Sight in 2016 and catapulted it to juggernaut status with sex and scandals.

The 1930s home has received a contemporary facelift. Source: Biller Property.
The 1930s home has received a contemporary facelift. Source: Biller Property.

 

It's under McWilliams the show expanded to include more couples, communal living arrangements and dinner parties. She also introduced more drama - with cheating scandals, couple swapping, fights and this year's toothbrush scandal.

" … It was a big gamble that paid off, we were quite surprised at how successful it became early on," she told The New Daily in 2018 about the changes she implemented when she took over.

It's also under her leadership the show has faced intense backlash and online petitions calling for it to be cancelled. A number of contestants have also come forward, blaming McWilliams and the production team for poor treatment and conditions.

The generous master bedroom overlooks the park. Source: Biller Property.
The generous master bedroom overlooks the park. Source: Biller Property.

 

On news.com.au's Not Here To Make Friends podcast, contestant David Cannon compared his time on the show to "prison" and accused the production team of "manipulating" him. He also said producers threatened contestants with bad editing.

Mishel Karen, who appeared on this year's series, told the Not Here To Make Friends podcast McWilliams and her team made contestants film into the early hours of the morning - refilming entire dinner parties and dictating how storylines should be played out.

McWilliams - who got her start producing on The Bachelor, MasterChef and The Biggest Loser - is highly involved throughout the production process. She's known to personally interview potential contestants and approve the final edit of footage.

With the coronavirus pandemic delaying a lot of Australian productions and forcing some into complete shutdowns, it seems McWilliams is moving full steam ahead with the 2021 MAFS series. In March she was pictured in an Instagram post wearing rubber gloves while sitting in her office. Applications opened for the upcoming series earlier this year, with production originally scheduled to kick off around August.

Of course MAFS will outlive COVID-19.
Of course MAFS will outlive COVID-19.

 

The home in Sydney’s exclusive Rose Bay sold for $2.37 – landing a $400,000 profit. Source: Biller Property.
The home in Sydney’s exclusive Rose Bay sold for $2.37 – landing a $400,000 profit. Source: Biller Property.
Light, bright and low-maintenance. Source: Biller Property.
Light, bright and low-maintenance. Source: Biller Property.

MORE DETAILS: What is causing Telstra outages in Ballina?

Premium Content MORE DETAILS: What is causing Telstra outages in Ballina?

Residents may not be able to use phones during 'planned maintenance'

Mining giant accused of taking covert photos of child

Mining giant accused of taking covert photos of child

Private investigator working for Adani photographed child