OPINION: Hot cars are death traps for pooches

Dogs shouldnt be left in cars in this hot weather Photo Renee Pilcher / The Gympie Times
Dogs shouldnt be left in cars in this hot weather Photo Renee Pilcher / The Gympie Times Renee Pilcher

AS TEMPERATURES soar and reach new records all over the country, please remember that dogs should never be left in parked vehicles.

They can become death traps in a matter of minutes.

Even on a mild, 25-degree day, the temperature inside a car parked in the shade can soar to between 37 and 50 degrees in minutes, and on a 30-degree day, the temperature can reach 70 degrees in less than 10 minutes.

Leaving the windows cracked (or even halfway down) and/or leaving water in the vehicle will not keep animals comfortable or safe.

With only hot air to breathe, dogs can succumb to heatstroke in as little as 15 minutes, resulting in brain damage or death.

Symptoms include restlessness, excessive thirst, heavy panting, lethargy, lack of appetite and coordination, dark tongue, and vomiting.

Please, when it's warm outside, leave animals at home.

If you see a dog left in a car, have the car's owner paged at nearby stores or call 000 immediately - the dog's life depends on it.

ASHLEY FRUNO, associate director PETA Australia

Topics:  dogs editors picks heat pets weather

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