Campers made a grisly find on a beach north of Brooms Head this week when they discovered the remains of a juvenile humpback whale.
Campers made a grisly find on a beach north of Brooms Head this week when they discovered the remains of a juvenile humpback whale.

Grisly discovery made on North Coast beach

A DEAD whale has washed up on a Clarence Valley beach, with a pair of campers making the sad discovery over the weekend.

The couple, who wish to remain anonymous, were camping at Red Cliff north of Brooms Head when they found a dead juvenile humpback on a beach north of the campground while on a beach walk on Sunday.

 

Campers made a grisly find on a beach north of Brooms Head this week when they discovered the remains of a juvenile humpback whale.
Campers made a grisly find on a beach north of Brooms Head this week when they discovered the remains of a juvenile humpback whale.

"We were hoping to see some whales frolicking in the ocean, not like this," the campers said.

"A pleasant Sunday stroll on the beach went unpleasant really quick. It was a shock, something that we didn't expect to see. It was sad."

This is not the first time a dead whale has washed up on a Clarence Valley beach, with a 2.5m humpback whale calf discovered on a beach near Sandon three years ago.

National Parks and Wildlife Service has been contacted for comment on what will happen to the carcass.

"From time to time whale carcasses may wash ashore as part of their natural life cycle. As a central advisory service and subject matter experts, National Parks and Wildlife Service will provide support and advice to other land managers when they need to deal with deceased whales on their land," the NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment website states.

Campers made a grisly find on a beach north of Brooms Head this week when they discovered the remains of a juvenile humpback whale.
Campers made a grisly find on a beach north of Brooms Head this week when they discovered the remains of a juvenile humpback whale.

During summer months, humpback whales spend their time feeding in Antarctica. They begin their annual migration north in late autumn to their breeding and calving in the warmer tropical waters of the Pacific before returning in spring.

Whales meet their need for food and suitable calving areas by travelling long distances from cold feeding areas, to warm, shallower waters for calving and mating.

For more information on whales, visit the National Parks and Wildlife Service Wild About Whales website.

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