This fish was found in a mandarin tree at Wallaville near Gin Gin.
This fish was found in a mandarin tree at Wallaville near Gin Gin. Contributed

Flood leaves fish in mandarin tree

THE majority of Australian grown mandarins have weathered Queensland's devastating floods - despite growers finding some unexpected surprises in the wake.

Growers in Wallaville near Gin Gin were surprised to find this fish (right) in one flood damaged tree.

Despite this, Australian grown mandarins are expected return to supermarket shelves as usual when the season commences in April, with fruit volume, quality and price not expected to be affected.

CEO of Citrus Australia, Judith Damiani, said the majority of Australian mandarins were grown in flood ravaged central Queensland, however most growers had escaped major crop damage and had good quality fruit remaining.

Owner of Glen Grove Orchard at Gayndah, Greg Parr, said approximately 6000 of his orchard’s 65,000 mandarin trees went underwater, with 1500 of these trees severely damaged, however the impact of the fruit losses would be minimal.

The Aussie mandarin season runs from April through to October.
 


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