Baby Names
Baby Names

Boardroom-proof baby names a hit in 2019

Babies born last year were named with the boardroom in mind, experts have revealed with conventional names like Charlotte and Oliver coming out on top.

Oliver, followed by Noah and William were the top baby names for boys according to data from the NSW Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages.

For girls, British royal family inspired Charlotte was the winner, narrowly followed by Olivia and Mia.

Melissah Crammond with kids William 6, Charlotte 4 and 8 month old Oliver. Picture: Tim Hunter.
Melissah Crammond with kids William 6, Charlotte 4 and 8 month old Oliver. Picture: Tim Hunter.


Parenting expert Michael Grose said this trend highlights that parents are choosing names that sound authoritative and would serve children well into adulthood.

"It's the boardroom test - if you're sitting on a board at 35, and someone turns around and introduces you as 'Here is Daisy Poo' it doesn't sound great. Parents are thinking about that," Mr Grose told The Daily Telegraph.

"Parents are more conservative, less likely to try trends. There's an element of social class in the whole notion of choosing names for kids and so choosing names for kids is an aspirational thing.

"From a middle class perspective people are starting to identify more with the royals in many ways."

 

 

The royal family connection was more evident in the list of top middle names with Grace, Elizabeth and Anne among the top 10 middle names for girls and William, Alexander and George among the top 10 for boys.

Mr Grose said parents are choosing names that represent their own personalities.

"Research shows the more traditional your name is the more likely you are to be successful. When families were larger you had lots of kids and kids were not an extension of yourself," he said.

 

"But as we have smaller and smaller families now naming a child is part of being a parent. Parents are asking, 'What's the brand I'm going to put on this child?'."

Menai mum Melissah Crammond went for traditional names from her British heritage for daughter Charlotte, 4, six-year-old William and newborn Oliver.

"Oliver was always the name we went back to. It didn't matter how many names we went through, we ended up coming back to it," she said.

"William was our first son named after my husband's grandfather. I like traditional names and wanted all three names to go together. When I named Oliver I wanted to make sure it went with William and Charlotte."

With middle names, Ms Crammond chose less common monikers, with Darcy for Oliver and Ben for William.

"I was going to name Charlotte, Charlotte Elizabeth because of a family tradition but then Princess Kate named her daughter that the same year and I didn't want to look like I copied her. So we went with Charlotte Grace."


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