Coast home to 500 witches: psychic

CONTRIBUTED

A FAMOUS TV witch says the Sunshine Coast is a sacred and magical haven to as many as 500 practising witches.

Stacey Demarco, a judge on the 2009 psychic Australian television show The One, said the region had a variety of covens and had attracted them because the Coast’s earth had a “deep and powerful energy”.

Ms Demarco, voted Australia’s 2009 psychic of the year, will be on the Coast this weekend to teach one of her invitation-only workshops for “intermediate” witches.

Ms Demarco is a metaphysicist and spiritual practitioner but describes herself as a witch because of her beliefs and personal practices. Just don’t call her a “white” witch.

“We don’t accept that word, it’s like saying a white buddhist or jew, it’s very insulting – we are witches.”

Ms Demarco said the modern witch was much different to far-fetched myths which she said unfortunately kept many Sunshine Coast covens “in the broom closet”.

“I’ve held workshops for about 60 in the past, but there are probably between 400 and 500 practising witches on the Coast,” Ms Demarco said.

“Your area is very sacred, there is a great healing, a deep and powerful energy.”

Ms Demarco said the Sunshine Coast was the “feminine” equal of the “masculine” Byron Bay.

“All you have to do is look around at how lush everything is, it is raining one minute then gloriously sunny the next.”

Ms Demarco said witches, or pagans, were people who loved the land.

“There is nothing evil about us, Satan is a Christian concept,” she said.

Witches definitely have spells, but the practice comes with a manual. “We never interfere with free will so we can’t get that boy next door to fall in love with you or your ex-husband to return,” Ms Demarco said.

Witches like Ms Dermarco believe it is futile to attempt to change natural cycles or disasters.

But they can put their powers to good in terms of disasters of the human side. “Covens from everywhere have posted their spells on my Facebook in sending cooling energy to the nuclear reactors in Japan,” Ms Demarco said.

“Humans make these natural cycles more intense as they did with the nuclear plant or the cyclone in North Queensland by taking the tree tops and building what they have in these areas.”

Read more about Ms Demarco in a Saturday feature, Young Believers, which looks at two everyday young Sunshine Coast women with two very different lives.



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